Empress Matilda

matilda

 

Empress Matilda

Matilda was born about 895 at the Villa of Engern in Westphalia, which is in northwestern Germany. She was Henry The Fowler’s second wife, as his first was declared invalid. Her grandmother who was the abbess in the monastery of Erfurt, which is in central Germany, raised her. They married in 909 and he presented Walhausen to her as her dowry. Walhausen is an Ortsgemeinde – a municipality belonging to a Verbandsgemeinde, a kind of collective municipality – in the Cochem-Zell district in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. At Henry’s Death she was bequeathed a large amount of land, Quedlinburg, Poehlden, Nordhausen, Grona, and Duderstadt. She had wanted her son Henry to succeed to the throne not Otto, the oldest which caused strife and a revolt that she later had to help resolve when Otto took the crown and Henry became Duke of Bavaria. Because of this, and what was considered excessive alms giving and donating to the building of churches, the country was in dire financial straights that she was blamed for. She forfeited her privately held lands to the crown and retired to the monasteries, that she had founded and died March 14, 968 at convents of Sts. Servatius and Dionysius at Quedlinburg where she was buried next to her husband.

She was a Duchess, Queen, Empress and Saint, though this seems to be solely via public proclamation. “The details of St. Matilda’s life come largely from brief mentions in the Res Gestae Saxonicae of the monastic historian Widukind of Corvey (c. 925 – 973), and from two sacred biographies: the Vita Antiquior and Vita Posterior), written, respectively, circa 974 and circa 1003.” 1

Sources:

http://catholicism.academic.ru/18810/St._Matilda

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_of_Ringelheim

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walhausen

http://ww.wgrogan.net/data/nti05571.html 1

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2 thoughts on “Empress Matilda

  1. Thanks for sharing this! Matilda of Ringelheim (895–968) and Henry “The Fowler” of East Francia (876–936) were my 32nd great-grandparents through their daughter Gerberga of Saxony (913–968).

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